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Ecological News

Guards shoot indigenous boy, 7, in India's 'shoot-to-kill' national park

The Ecologist Magazine - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 17:50
A 7-year old boy has been shot by park guards in Kaziranga national park, India, visited in April by Prince William and Kate, which operates a strict 'shoot first' policy. The incident highlights the government's wider efforts to evict tribal peoples from their forests in the name of conservation.
Categories: Ecological News

Charting Environmental Conflict - The Atlas of Environmental Justice

The Ecologist Magazine - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 16:52
Instead of leaching the world's resources to support out-of-control consumerism, EU leaders could do worse than ponder novelist Victor Hugo's claim that whilst "you can kill people, you can't kill an idea whose time has come", writes NICK MEYNEN
Categories: Ecological News

Can Industrial Hemp Save Kentucky’s Small Farms?

Yes! Magazine - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 12:30
As tobacco declines, some hope that hemp can be a “gateway crop” to financial sustainability for the state’s small farms.
Categories: Ecological News

NASA science flights target melting Arctic Sea ice

ENN Pollution - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 03:52
This summer, with sea ice across the Arctic Ocean shrinking to below-average levels, a NASA airborne survey of polar ice just completed its first flights. Its target: aquamarine pools of melt water on the ice surface that may be accelerating the overall sea ice retreat.NASA's Operation IceBridge completed the first research flight of its new 2016 Arctic summer campaign on July 13. The science flights, which continue through July 25, are collecting data on sea ice in a year following a record-warm winter in the Arctic.The summer flights will map the extent, frequency and depth of melt ponds, the pools of melt water that form on sea ice during spring and summer. Recent studies have found that the formation of melt ponds early in the summer is a good predictor of the sea ice yearly minimum extent in September: if there are more ponds on the ice earlier in the melt season, they reduce the ability of sea ice to reflect solar radiation, which leads to more melt.
Categories: Ecological News

NASA science flights target melting Arctic Sea ice

ENN Climate - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 03:52
This summer, with sea ice across the Arctic Ocean shrinking to below-average levels, a NASA airborne survey of polar ice just completed its first flights. Its target: aquamarine pools of melt water on the ice surface that may be accelerating the overall sea ice retreat.NASA's Operation IceBridge completed the first research flight of its new 2016 Arctic summer campaign on July 13. The science flights, which continue through July 25, are collecting data on sea ice in a year following a record-warm winter in the Arctic.The summer flights will map the extent, frequency and depth of melt ponds, the pools of melt water that form on sea ice during spring and summer. Recent studies have found that the formation of melt ponds early in the summer is a good predictor of the sea ice yearly minimum extent in September: if there are more ponds on the ice earlier in the melt season, they reduce the ability of sea ice to reflect solar radiation, which leads to more melt.
Categories: Ecological News

2016 climate trends continue to break records

ENN Pollution - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 03:14
Two key climate change indicators -- global surface temperatures and Arctic sea ice extent -- have broken numerous records through the first half of 2016, according to NASA analyses of ground-based observations and satellite data.Each of the first six months of 2016 set a record as the warmest respective month globally in the modern temperature record, which dates to 1880, according to scientists at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York. The six-month period from January to June was also the planet's warmest half-year on record, with an average temperature 1.3 degrees Celsius (2.4 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than the late nineteenth century.Five of the first six months of 2016 also set records for the smallest respective monthly Arctic sea ice extent since consistent satellite records began in 1979, according to analyses developed by scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Maryland. The one exception, March, recorded the second smallest extent for that month.
Categories: Ecological News

2016 climate trends continue to break records

ENN Climate - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 03:14
Two key climate change indicators -- global surface temperatures and Arctic sea ice extent -- have broken numerous records through the first half of 2016, according to NASA analyses of ground-based observations and satellite data.Each of the first six months of 2016 set a record as the warmest respective month globally in the modern temperature record, which dates to 1880, according to scientists at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York. The six-month period from January to June was also the planet's warmest half-year on record, with an average temperature 1.3 degrees Celsius (2.4 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than the late nineteenth century.Five of the first six months of 2016 also set records for the smallest respective monthly Arctic sea ice extent since consistent satellite records began in 1979, according to analyses developed by scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Maryland. The one exception, March, recorded the second smallest extent for that month.
Categories: Ecological News

Using urban pigeons to monitor lead pollution

ENN Pollution - Wed, 07/20/2016 - 00:32
Tom Lehrer sang about poisoning them, but those pigeons in the park might be a good way to detect lead and other toxic compounds in cities. A new study of pigeons in New York City shows that levels of lead in the birds track with neighborhoods where children show high levels of lead exposure."Pigeons breathe the same air, walk the same sidewalks, and often eat the same food as we do. What if we could use them to monitor possible dangers to our health in the environment, like lead pollution?" said Rebecca Calisi, now an assistant professor in the Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior at the University of California, Davis, who conducted the study with undergraduate student Fayme Cai while at Barnard College, Columbia University. The work is published July 18 in the journal Chemosphere.Decades after it was banned from paint and gasoline, lead pollution remains a significant concern. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene carries out routine screening of children in areas of the city identified as hot spots for lead contamination.
Categories: Ecological News

Will Theresa May's new heavyweight Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy put climate change centre stage?

The Ecologist Magazine - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 23:07
At first glance the abolition of the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) tolled a death knell for UK action on global warming. However, rising from the ashes is a new department that has the potential to put the climate agenda at the very heart of Government.
Categories: Ecological News

How to Trellis Tomatoes for Maximum Yield

EarthEasy Blog - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 22:04
Keep your homegrown tomato plants off the ground to encourage a bountiful harvest.
Categories: Ecological News

Ship engine emissions adversely affect macrophages

ENN Climate - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 21:30
In cooperation with colleagues of the University of Rostock, the University of Luxembourg, the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the University of Eastern Finland, the Munich Scientists have now published the results in the journal PLOS ONE. In 2015 they already showed that exposure to particle emissions from heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF) adversely affects human lung cells and is responsible for strong biological responses of the cells ("How Ship Emissions Adversely Affect Lung Cells"). For example, inflammatory processes are triggered that may influence the development of interstitial lung diseases. Now the team led by Professor Ralf Zimmermann has found in further studies that macrophages are also influenced by the exhaust gases. These are much more sensitive than lung epithelial cells and therefore react more strongly to exposure. Zimmermann is speaker of the international consortium Helmholtz Virtual Institute of Complex Molecular Systems in Environmental Health (HICE), head of the cooperation group Comprehensive Molecular Analytics (CMA) at Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen and head of the Department of Analytical Chemistry at the University of Rostock.
Categories: Ecological News

Ship engine emissions adversely affect macrophages

ENN Pollution - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 21:30
In cooperation with colleagues of the University of Rostock, the University of Luxembourg, the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the University of Eastern Finland, the Munich Scientists have now published the results in the journal PLOS ONE. In 2015 they already showed that exposure to particle emissions from heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF) adversely affects human lung cells and is responsible for strong biological responses of the cells ("How Ship Emissions Adversely Affect Lung Cells"). For example, inflammatory processes are triggered that may influence the development of interstitial lung diseases. Now the team led by Professor Ralf Zimmermann has found in further studies that macrophages are also influenced by the exhaust gases. These are much more sensitive than lung epithelial cells and therefore react more strongly to exposure. Zimmermann is speaker of the international consortium Helmholtz Virtual Institute of Complex Molecular Systems in Environmental Health (HICE), head of the cooperation group Comprehensive Molecular Analytics (CMA) at Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen and head of the Department of Analytical Chemistry at the University of Rostock.
Categories: Ecological News

Offshore wind powers ahead as prices drop 30% below nuclear

ENN Climate - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 20:00
The cost of offshore wind power in the North Sea is 30% lower than that of new nuclear, writes Kieran Cooke - helped along by low oil and steel prices, reduced maintenance and mass production. By 2030 the sector is expected to supply 7% of Europe's electricity. Output from the Dogger Bank project will be 1.2 GW (gigawatts) - enough to power more than a million homes. Next year, a 150-turbine wind farm off the coast of the Netherlands is due to start operating, and other schemes along the Dutch coast are in the works. Denmark, Sweden and Portugal are major investors in offshore wind, and China has ambitious plans for the sector. Wind farms - both onshore and offshore - are a key ingredient in renewable energy policy, and an important element in the battle against climate change. WindEurope, an offshore wind industry group, says that at the present rate of installations it's likely Europe will be producing about 7% of its electricity from offshore wind by 2030.Offshore wind developers benefit from falling costsBy some calculations, all this building work would seem to make little economic sense. Fossil fuel prices are low on the world market, and constructing offshore wind farms several kilometres out at sea, in often treacherous conditions, has traditionally been an expensive business.
Categories: Ecological News

Offshore wind powers ahead as prices drop 30% below nuclear

ENN Pollution - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 20:00
The cost of offshore wind power in the North Sea is 30% lower than that of new nuclear, writes Kieran Cooke - helped along by low oil and steel prices, reduced maintenance and mass production. By 2030 the sector is expected to supply 7% of Europe's electricity. Output from the Dogger Bank project will be 1.2 GW (gigawatts) - enough to power more than a million homes. Next year, a 150-turbine wind farm off the coast of the Netherlands is due to start operating, and other schemes along the Dutch coast are in the works. Denmark, Sweden and Portugal are major investors in offshore wind, and China has ambitious plans for the sector. Wind farms - both onshore and offshore - are a key ingredient in renewable energy policy, and an important element in the battle against climate change. WindEurope, an offshore wind industry group, says that at the present rate of installations it's likely Europe will be producing about 7% of its electricity from offshore wind by 2030.Offshore wind developers benefit from falling costsBy some calculations, all this building work would seem to make little economic sense. Fossil fuel prices are low on the world market, and constructing offshore wind farms several kilometres out at sea, in often treacherous conditions, has traditionally been an expensive business.
Categories: Ecological News

Rio Olympics: Who are the real winners and losers?

Environmental Health News - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 19:30
With just weeks to go until the start of the Games is it possible to assess exactly how this city of more than 6 million has really been impacted – for good and bad – by the awarding of the Olympics?
Categories: Ecological News

Poor cancer care for Native Americans might be a treaty violation.

Environmental Health News - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 19:30
There’s a cruel joke often told in Indian country: “Don’t get sick after June.” The sick truth beneath those words is that by summertime the Indian Health Service has typically blown its meager fiscal year budget.
Categories: Ecological News

NOAA study finds residents should still limit, avoid eating Cocos Lagoon fish.

Environmental Health News - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 19:30
Results of the assessment, which was conducted in 2015, show that sediment and fish in the lagoon are still tainted with polychlorinated biphenyls and surprisingly, DDT, banned in 1972., Ten years after Guam health and environmental agencies began advising residents to limit or avoid eating fish caught in Cocos Lagoon, a new federal assessment states there’s a continued need for the advisory.
Categories: Ecological News

California agency kicks off first priority product rulemaking.

Environmental Health News - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 19:30
A rulemaking is underway concerning children's foam-padded sleeping products containing the flame retardants TDCPP and TCEP.
Categories: Ecological News

Beijing says air quality improved in first half of 2016.

Environmental Health News - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 19:30
Beijing's notoriously awful air quality improved significantly in the first half of the year, with actions taken to curb the city's heavy pollution having a positive effect, officials in the Chinese capital said.
Categories: Ecological News

Too many deer on the road? Let cougars return.

Environmental Health News - Tue, 07/19/2016 - 19:30
Allowing cougars to repopulate the Eastern U.S. could cut deer numbers and reduce the number of lives lost to deer-car collisions, a scientific study says.
Categories: Ecological News
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